for where includes


article Chatterbox 32 1876
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253 Despite the caption, the engraving is embarrasingly similar to an earlier one of Crystallised Cavern in Blue John Mine (p193 of Illustrated London News v.25, 1854)picture
articleClimbers Club : Journal The Caves of Castleton. c.1985
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Information leaflet. 1 page folded. Map. Illustrations. Blue John Cave, Speedwell Mine, Peak Cavern.map,picture
article European Magazine 1st Feb. 1814
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Frontispiece is an engraving of Peak Cavernpicture
article Illustrated London News Vol.36 28th Jan. 1860
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96Full page engraving of Peak Cavern entrance picture
article Monumental Journal Vol.25. No.5. 1858
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284An illustration of a paper weight bearing a picture of Peak Cavern. Now in the possession of Dr. T.D.Ford. (Information from Shaw, T.R. Cave Illustrations before 1900).picture
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Puttrell, J.W.An article containing a half tone reproduction of Leigh, C. (See Shaw, 1967).picture
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A general and rather amateurish compilation from various sources. With a woodcut and plan. One peculiarity in this account is the appelation “Auld Horney” for the cave. [Reprinted in British Caver Vol.30. 1958].picture,survey
article Wide World Magazine September 1902 held by: BGS/BCA/B.S.A.Records Vol.1
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Puttrell, J.W.The Secret of the Peak Cavern - A chatty account of the 1902 explorations.picture
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Half tone reproduction of engraving in Spencer, N. 1771. .picture
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271-275Derivative, hack, description of Devil's Hole. Variant of Journey book print picture
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73-74,498-499 The description of the cave is very concise, and would appear to stem from direct conversation with guides and miners. Relates extensively to the work of the latter. includes an important reference to the flooding of the cave in wet weather. The engraving drawn by E.Dayes and engraved by Newman, 1794, shows the inn or shop amongst the cottages and a peculiar domed structure beyond them. Both of Peak Cavern and Eldon Hole the descriptions appear to show an advanced appreciation of the drainage system. Size 23 x 16 cms: Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com picture
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fp.122 of Vol.3Inferior version of Buck's engraving. picture
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frontispiece picture
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133-136Includes woodcut of the entrance and a plan (based on Rooke's in Brayley; key as for BM watercolour plan) Shows position of the Second Water, but then becomes vague and ends before the Five Arches.
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23Perhaps "Sketches of Derbyshire Scenery" by Samuel Rayner (first published 1830)? picture
bookAnon. : Volcanoes and Caverns 1865 held by: Brit. Mus. 7108 a.55.
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47Wood engraving of Peak Cavern in text.picture
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197-201La Cave du Diable - Shows rope walks and a hovel. Quoted by E.A. Martel (qv) translated in British Caver Vol.10. 1943. p.80. picture
miscBates, J.C. : Views Views in Derbyshire. c.1861
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No.11. f.4. picture
miscBates, J.C. : Views Views in Buxton and neighbourhood. c.1869
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Plate 17. picture
miscBates, J.C. : Views Views in Buxton and High Peak. c.1871
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f.43. picture
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39-42The Peak Cavern, or Devil's Cave, Derbyshire. Contains a Ground-Plan from an Indian ink drawing by Hayman Rooke, Esq. F.S.A. [a copy of the 1762 watercolour in the British Library?], and three reduced copies of Edmund Dayes' drawings as vignettes. Asserts that the water come from Perryfoot, and "from the ratchell, or small stones brought into the cavern after great rains, has an evident communication with the distant mines of the Peak Forest." hydrology,picture,survey
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Pl.45,46,47 Drawings are smaller, unattributed, variants of those in in Britten & Bayley picture
misc Water Colour of Peak Cavern 1782 held by: British Museum, Kings Topographical Collection. XI. 26d.
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A coloured view of the "entrance into Castleton Cave" or the Peak Cavern; drawn in the year 1782 - 27 x 20 cm. picture
misc View of Peak Cavern 1782 held by: British Library, K.Top.11.26e.
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A general view of Peveril’s Place in the Peak, and of the entrance to "Peak Hole" or the Peak Cavern - 17 x 11 cm. picture
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Plate 8: "A Prospect of the Rocks and that vast Cavern at Castleton call'd Peak-hole alias the D---l's A-se T.Smith pinx. et del. Granville sc." 31st May 1743: print 393 x 544 mm (Upcott,W., A Bibliographical Account of the Principal Works relating to English Topography, 1818) picture
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463-466 of Vol.IIIA very good account of the then known cave, with two cottages in the entrance. The account is accompanied by engravings: 1) the approaches and gorge, taking in the bridge. This is quite the best I have seen, engraved by Greig from a drawing by E.Dayes. 2) Part called Great Tom of Lincoln. Engraved by I.Smith. Drawn by E.Dayes. Size 15 x 11 cms: Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com 3) Roger Rains House, Engraved by S.Noble. Drawing by E.Dayes. Size 15.5 x 11.5 cms: Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com 4) View from the interior of the Great Arch (looking out). Engraved by I.Roffe. Drawn by E.Dayes. Size 15 x 11 cms: Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com picture
bookBuck, Samuel & Nathaniel : Views of Ruins of Castles & Abbeys in England, Part 2, 1726-1739 held by: BGS/BCA/B.S.A.Records Vol.5: Speedwell Cavern; British Library K.Top.Vol.11.26.b
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The North-West View of Castleton Castle, and the Devil’s Arse in the Peak S. B. delin. N.B. Sculp. 1727picture
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Two plates: Rocks and cave called the Devil's Arse in the Peak in Derbyshire - engraved by Burlington, C. and View of the Rocks and cave called the Devil's Arse in the Peak in Derbyshire; both 27.5 x 17 cms. (Cave Illustrations before 1900, by T.R.Shaw)picture
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In pt.VI. (Cave Illustrations before 1900, by T.R.Shaw)picture
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"Engraved by W. B. and George Cooke after drawings by Sir Francis L. Chantrey; with historical and topographical descriptions by James Croston"; originals in Rhodes' “Peak Scenery” (1822): Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com picture
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110picture
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47-65This famous description, first published in 1681, which will be the date of the description, is accompanied by very fanciful engraving showing no less than seven houses, placed on both sides of the cave. Written in a somewhat coarse and (bawdy?) strain (style?) it makes amusing reading. The engraving by Mr D.R.Gucht entitled “Devil’s Arse near Castleton”. A.the Devil's Arse B.Houses within the Arse ..people live C.the first water D.the Second ...E.the third F...where the rock and water ...furtherpicture
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325-335Includes “Wonders of the Peak” and the engravingpicture
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fp.338"The Devil's Arse, the Sixth Wonder"picture
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40-45A matter of fact first hand account of Peak Cavern. It is accompanied by a woodcut by W.Morton of the entrance, rope walks, and guides hut. This is really a very creditable sketch. James Croston could not bring himself to believe that water was responsible for the cavern’s formation.picture
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157,158,259A passing reference with a very acceptable sketch by W.A.Bettesworth and advertisement for Peak Cavern when Mr Isaac Hall was guide.picture
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509-510Has in it a handbill to Peak Cavern. Isaac Hall is the guide. A line drawing of Peak Cavern Gorge and entrance – a passing mention in the text.picture
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221-223Little more than a passing reference, but mentions Gilpin’s trip in 1772, quotes from James Ferguson's visit in the same year, and records Byron's visit with Mary A.Chaworth. A sketch of the gorge from a distance by Nellie Erichson: picture
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15-26Peak Cavernphoto,picture,survey
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2 watercolours: the entrance to the Devil's Hole (repr. Mallalieu) and a view looking out together with a detailed, annotated planpicture,survey
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frontispiece.picture
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196-198A short account of Peak Cavern and Speedwell. Of the latter recounts the birth of Jeremy Royse (later to be proprietor of the mine) in the boat. Woodcut of rope walks in Peak Cavern entrance is identical to that given in Bradbury (1884).picture
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10/17picture
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14-15,16-20Outer cover gives it as “Guide through Peak’s Hole with a Description of the Curiosities of Castleton” and has Peak Cavern price list on back. Hedinger was interested in geology, and a good observer. He records that Samuel Needham was a working miner at Odin, and was prepared to take visitors into the mine. Also, at the public house at the entrance to Speedwell he states that guides can be obtained for visits to several other mines of much greater extent, but very difficult of access. picture
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Painting exhibited at Royal Academy (The Morning Post, May 3rd)picture
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74.picture
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Engravingpicture
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43-44,193The text is little more than a passing mention. Tab.VII is a stylised woodcut of Peak Cavern (completely imaginative). picture
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65-69A conventional account. He refers to Gervaise of Tilbury, Adams, and Moore, and the story is accompanied by a fairly realistic sketch by Alfred Dawson which seems to suggest a pub opposite the Custodian’s residence.picture
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Peak’s Hole - Perhaps the source for Polehampton's drawing but with notable differences: 1) no sky visible at entrance, apparently 2) shows visitors embarking on boat, with rope making nearer the entrance. Engraved by William Pickettpicture
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Entrance of the great Cavern at Castleton - An interesting double page engraving of Peak Cavern Gorge and Cave Entrance, drawn by J.Farington & engraved by Letitia Byrne. Size 37.5 x 25.5 cms: Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com picture
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244-5 of V.3Reproduction of "the entrance to the Devil's Hole" by Thomas Sandby or, perhaps, Thomas Theodosius Forrestpicture
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8,49-51"The noted cavern of Peak's hole has been so often described that any further account would be superfluous", but attempts a geological explanation of Speedwell Mine, naming various veins.geology,picture
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Vol.4Engraver of an original drawing of Peak Cavern: adverised in Morning Chronicle, July 16th, 1808 picture
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A slightly expanded version of Moncrieff (1904). Has a coloured picture of the gorge almost identical with that in Leyland (1891).picture
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85-88,95-101Engraved title page . Contains an account of the driving of the Speedwell Level, as well as a trip in Peak Cavern, or the Devil's Cave, where the water has been traced with chaff " 4 miles from the Manchester Road".hydrology,picture
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16-19A brief account. For Speedwell he quotes Rhodes. The coloured pictures are as in Moncrieff’s “Derbyshire” done by W.Biscombe Gardner.picture
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Munn (1773-1845) painted in oil on canvas a view of the entrance that appears to be the basis of subsequent engravings in Penny Magazine (1834) [where poles become vertical] and, from this, in Anon.(1841), Badin (1870), Adams (1876) [all with slight variations]. From Wikigallerypicture
miscMunn, Paul Sandby : Peak Cavern 1807 held by: Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester (D.1892.56)
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Apparently a watercolour copy of the 1803 viewpicture
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202Reference and small photo of Munn (1807)picture
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31,61(Cave Illustrations before 1900, by T.R.Shaw).picture
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fp.83Interior View of the Peak of Derbyshire engraved from a drawing by Clenellpicture
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11(Cave Illustrations before 1900 by T.R. Shaw).picture
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fp.83(Cave Illustrations before 1900 by T.R. Shaw).picture
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14-16, 27-28 of Vol.2The descriptions are highly romanticised and of little use. There are two engravings, one of the ‘Gorge’ by Miss A.Rhodes now Mrs Oates of Naples, and the other of the Rope Walks looking out by F. Chantrey, both engraved by George Cooke.picture
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Approach to Peak's Hole -Engravings by W.B. and G. Cooke from drawings by F.Chantrey only included in Imperial and Royal Quarto editions; also available seperatelypicture
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170-173,177-179A romanticised account of Peak Cavern, partly borrowed from ‘Peak Scenery’. Speedwell – refers to A.Moore’s ‘Excursion in the Peak’ – nothing original in the account. There is an interesting but not very good lithograph by W.Crane, drawn by Miss Rhodes.picture
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f.18. .picture
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f.18. .picture
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f.40 & f.44. .picture
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Includes details of 70 plates on Peak Cavern. This book is a catalogue of non-photographic illustrations of caves which consists of a brief introduction and then a straight list of prints classified into four sections: British Isles, 363 entries; the rest of Europe, 314 entries; non-European caves, 148 entries; unidentified caves, 27 entries; and imaginary caves, 50 entries. There is an overall sequential numbering of entries and, within each group, entries are arranged in alphabetic order of cave name. For each entry there is published, where known, the title, mode of reproduction, artist, reproducer, publisher, date, size, origin, whereabouts of picture or source of information, and description. In addition a geographical index lists the prints by country and, for certain countries, by district. The source book is given in all cases, its location is frequently omitted. An incidental feature of the book is that it forms a guide as to what caves were open and popularly visited up to the turn of the century. Peak Cavern, with its vast entrance, is the most popular subject with seventy prints, with Fingal's Cave, Staffa and Wookey Hole, Somerset as late runners-up. Postojna in Yugoslavia emerges as the principal foreign contender. Most artists content themselves with drawings of entrances, or draw large chambers with figures dotted around the middle distance. Many give free reign to their imaginations. One of the illustrations reproduced of Cox's Cave, Cheddar has magnified the dimensions of the cave tenfold. Two names stand out in the British section; William Westhall, who was a prolific artist in the Yorkshire Cave region, and the Reverend John Skinner, who seems to have travelled about the country extensively, producing innumer- able drawings of cave entrances. (from Archives of natural history, Journal of the Society for the Bibliography of Natural History. Volume 4, Page 395-396) picture
bookSimpson, Samuel : The Agreeable Historian 1746 held by: British Library 10348.b.20
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fp.215 of Vol.1Hermann MollMiniature of Devil’s Arse from the map. picture
bookSkinner, John : Sketches in Wales and Derbyshire, etc: 1803 held by: (?) Brit. Mus. Add. MS 33640; Matlock
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MS Journal. Pencil and water colours of Peak Cavern (5 in number). .picture
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On page 1 is a photograph of an engraving – this comes from a book “England Displayed”, published by Bemrose. There are photos of the gorge and Peak Cavern entrance. A nice colour plate of the gorge. Text brief.photo,picture
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23-24Cover illustration of the entrance to Peak Cavern with the Rope Walks from Rhodes’ “Peak Scenery”, and inside is a contemporary photo. The text is little more than a passing mention.photo,picture
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Engraving of Devil's A-se. From Postaprintpicture
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f.5. . Starling was an artist...picture
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Vol.3, Plate 11. .picture
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f.48 & f.46. .picture
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f.49 & f.52. .picture
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Watercolour; Inscribed, "Study of Butterbur (Petasites vulgaris, Desf.) the largest leaf of any English plant," in the foreground. catalogue entry

Hearne (1744-1817)

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Derbyshire - Marks "Cavern" (above Peak Forest) and shows a miniature of "The Entrance to the Peak Cavern" .map,picture
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fp.156,160 of Vol.2Base, uncoloured versions of county maps; Peake Cavern, or Devil's Cave, briefly described.map,picture
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37Reproduces a coloured version from 1842: essentially the same, but frequent revisions were made to add new railway lines.map,picture
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45Westall, WilliamThe Entrance to the Peak Cavern - Standard text, but Westall's drawing, engraved by Finden shows the hovel on the top bench and another on a lower terrace. .picture
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9-10Westall, WilliamThe Entrance to the Peak Cavern - Same text as 1830, but revised format Size 13.5 x 10.5 cms: Image courtesy of ancestryimages.com shows the hovel on the top bench and another on a lower terrace. picture
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3-20A succinct and useful account of early exploration into Peak and Speedwell. Tales of Puttrell and Bishop. Mentions John Pym and Dr Taylor, and the latter’s account in Speedwell in 1860 (in “Geological Essays”). Mr Joseph Walker was Custodian. There is a copy of an old print of Peak Cavern Gorge as frontispiece, and several photos including one of William Eyre in his boat in Speedwell. A must for any compiler of the Peak / Speedwell history.photo,picture
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183-201One of the best of the early accounts, with three famous engravings by Isaac Cruickshank from Woodward's drawings:
Crossing the first river - spot the dog
After passing - with dog and choir
Passing the second river - still with the dog

Biog.note: Woodward (1760?-1809), grew up at Stanton-by-Vale, became known as 'Mustard George' when he moved to London and lived as a caricaturist and author or several more books 'broadly humourous and without literary distinction'. He is credited as a pioneer of the strip cartoon, and social humour, generally in a ribald or jokey manner and of the lower and middle classes rather than high society, with a penchant for (drawing) sailors, low company, and immoderate drinking (which perhaps explains his death in the Brown Bear with a glass of brandy in his hand). (from: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 2004)
Isaac Cruikshank (1764-1811) was a caricaturist and painter, born in Edinburgh but based in London from 1784. He was prolific both in his own right and in working up the ideas of others, notably G.M.Woodward. (from: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, 2004)

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218Illustration by W.Hennessy, of no caving significance. .fiction,picture
journal British Caver Vol 10. 1943
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80La Cave du Diable - [translated from Badin,A. (1870)]picture
journal British Caver Vol.30 1958
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A general and rather amateurish compilation from various sources. With a woodcut and plan. One peculiarity in this account is the appelation “Auld Horney” for the cave. We have never seen this anywhere else. [Reprinted from Penny Magazine, No.131. April, 1834].picture,survey
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13-15Shaw, T.R.Some Old Prints of Derbyshire Caves (1700-1872) - A list of prints shown as slides at the 1967 B.S.A. Annual Conference. 19 are of Peak Cavern.picture
journal Descent No.141. 1998
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32Wonder of the Peak - Potted history, Roger Rain's House print, and request for info on a poster printed by George Slater of Sheffield when the guide was Isaac Hall, and entrance was 2s. for one, 3s.6d. for two, 1s. for each additional person - and an extra 1s. for Bengal lights.picture
miscHarding, James Duffield : Peveril Castle, Derbyshire 1845 held by: Government Art Collection
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A watercolour Size: 26x37cm.picture
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A watercolour picture
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A watercolour picture